S004M-1 M14 Scout Tactical AEG
S004M-1 M14 Scout Tactical AEG
S004M-1 M14 Scout Tactical AEG
S004M-1 M14 Scout Tactical AEG
S004M-1 M14 Scout Tactical AEG
S004M-1 M14 Scout Tactical AEG
S004M-1 M14 Scout Tactical AEG
S004M-1 M14 Scout Tactical AEG
S004M-1 M14 Scout Tactical AEG
S004M-1 M14 Scout Tactical AEG


Classic Army

S004M-1 M14 Scout Tactical AEG

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The Classic Army M14 Scout Tactical features a lengthy 463mm tightbore barrel and a large 470rd magazine, making it ideal as a designated marksman rifle for medium to long ranges.  Realistic functional controls include the cocking lever, safety, bolt cover, and fire selector.  The CNC machined rail system allows for mounting of additional optics, lights, lasers and other standard rail mounted accessories.

Internally, this gun uses a 9mm bearing gearbox, stainless steel bore up cylinder, aluminum bore up cylinder head, aluminum bore up piston head, wire cut steel gears, inline mosfet protected trigger contacts, and a 6.03mm tightbore barrel.  The wiring consists of low resistance silver trigger wiring and low heat deans connectors with an included deans to tamiya adapter.  It fires 375-400 fps with 0.20g BBs at a rate of 800-900 rpm using a 9.6V battery.  It is lipo ready right out of the box.

90 day warranty.

Overall Length 1025mm
Overall Weight 3820g
Inner Barrel Length 463mm
Inner Barrel Diameter 6.03mm
Hop-Up Adjustable
Piston Material Heat Treated Polymer
Cylinder Head Aluminum Bore-Up
Gearbox 9mm Bearing Metal Gearbox
Gearset Wire Cut, Steel 22:1 gear ratio
Rate of Fire 800-900 rpm with 9.6V battery
Velocity 375-400 fps with 0.20g BBs

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M14 rifle, officially the United States Rifle, 7.62 mm, M14, is an American selective fire automatic rifle that fires 7.62×51mm NATO (.308 Winchester) ammunition. It gradually replaced the M1 Garand in U.S. Army service by 1961 and in U.S. Marine Corps service by 1965. It was the standard issue infantry rifle for U.S. military personnel in the contiguous United States, Europe, and South Korea from 1959 until it was replaced by the M16 rifle in 1970. The M14 was used for U.S. Army, Navy and Marine Corps basic and Advanced Individual Training (AIT) from the mid-1960s to the early 1970s.

The M14 was the last American "battle rifle" (weapons that fire full-power rifle ammunition, such as the 7.62×51 mm) issued in quantity to U.S. military personnel. The rifle remains in limited service in all branches of the U.S. military as an accurized competition weapon, a ceremonial weapon by honor guards, color guards, drill teams, and ceremonial guards, and sniper rifle/designated marksman rifle. The M14 serves as the basis for the M21 and M25 sniper rifles.

After the M14's adoption, Springfield Armory began tooling a new production line in 1958, delivering the first service rifles to the U.S. Army in July 1959. However, long production delays resulted in the 101st Airborne Division being the only unit in the Army fully equipped with the M14 by the end of 1961. The Fleet Marine Force finally completed the change from M1 to M14 in late 1962. Springfield Armory records reflect that M14 manufacture ended as TRW, fulfilling its second contract, delivered its final production increment in Fiscal Year 1965 (1 July '64 – 30 June '65). The Springfield archive also indicates the 1.38 million rifles were acquired for just over $143 million, for a unit cost of about $104.

The rifle served adequately during its brief tour of duty in Vietnam. Though it was unwieldy in the thick brush due to its length and weight, the power of the 7.62 mm NATO cartridge allowed it to penetrate cover quite well and reach out to extended range, developing 2,560 ft·lbf (3,463 J) of muzzle energy. However, there were several drawbacks to the M14. The traditional wood stock of the rifle had a tendency to swell and expand in the heavy moisture of the jungle, adversely affecting accuracy. Fiberglass stocks were produced to resolve this problem, but the rifle was discontinued before very many could be distributed for field use. Also, because of the M14's powerful 7.62×51 mm cartridge, the weapon was deemed virtually uncontrollable in fully automatic mode, so most M14s were permanently set to semi-automatic fire only to avoid wasting ammunition in combat.